Coffee and Tea Should Be Avoided, says Women's Health Expert

by Sue
(New York)

green tea plants are grown in rows that are pruned to produce shoots

green tea plants are grown in rows that are pruned to produce shoots

green tea plants are grown in rows that are pruned to produce shoots
green tea is full of polyphenols and antioxidants, and is great for your health
Go easy on the capuccino - too much coffee can make you lose water and nutrients
Can't imagine the English without their afternoon tea - the cup that cheers and all that

Dr. Marilyn Glenville, famous author and women's specialist says that, although coffee and black tea are staples in the lifestyles of most of us, neither has much of a place in the diet of a healthy woman. She explains that, because water is so essential to your wellbeing, as a general rule you need to avoid anything that has a diuretic effect on your body. This is because diuretics increase the flow of urine (water) out of you, along with essential nutrients that your body hasn’t yet had time to absorb. Coffee and black tea both contain a diuretic in the form of the stimulant caffeine. But de-caff isn’t necessarily any better for you, seh says. The decaffeination process uses chemicals to remove the caffeine, and coffee still contains two other stimulants (theobromine and theophylline) explains Dr. Glenville.


Caffeinated tea can have some health benefits, according to the doctor because it contains some zinc and some folic acid, as well as bone-building manganese and potassium, and flavonoids, which are good antioxidants.

So Dr. Glenville's recommendation is that you try to eliminate coffee entirely from your diet, but at worst have only one cup of organic coffee a day. Then, instead of drinking black tea, switch to green tea (the health benefits of green tea outweigh its caffeine content) or herbal tea.

Luckily both of those are delicious.

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